Which dry fruit is good for a Heart patient?

Which dry fruit is good for a Heart patient? The heart is one of the most important organs of the body. Its main function is to provide power for blood flow and transport blood to all parts of the body. Pistachios are an important source of protein, healthy fats, #carbohydrates, carotene, vitamin E, vitamin K, arginine, folic acid and various minerals (including #potassium, #calcium, #sodium, #magnesium, #iron, and #zinc). At the same time, pistachios are the dry fruit that are most beneficial to heart health. Therefore, Pistachios Are Known As "friends of the Heart." Pistachios are rich in arginine, which helps increase nitric oxide in the body, and nitric oxide plays an important role in lowering blood pressure, lowering blood lipids, and preventing arterial blockage. In addition, pistachios are one of the foods with the highest phytosterol content. Phytosterols can inhibit the absorption of cholesterol and the synthesis of cholesterol, which is very benef…
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What is a Fig Fruit?

What is a Fig Fruit? Figs are slightly sweet and are a very nutritious fruit. Figs are known as "the patron saint of human health in the 21st century". 100g figs contain 1.4g protein, 3.2g dietary fiber, 0.11g fat, 31 micrograms of carotene, 5.1 micrograms of vitamin A, 1.85 mg of vitamin E, 0.03 mg of vitamin B1, 0.02 mg of vitamin B2, and 0.11 mg of niacin. Potassium 213 mg, calcium 68 mg, phosphorus 19 mg, sodium 5.4 mg, manganese 0.18 mg, iron 0.12 mg, copper 0.01 mg. Figs contain active anti-cancer substances such as psoralen, bergamot lactone and benzoaldehyde. These substances have a significant inhibitory effect on cancer cells and can prevent cancer cells from synthesizing proteins, causing cancer cells to lose nutrients and thus die. Figs are rich in lipase, hydrolase, protease and other enzymes, which can reduce blood fat, break down fat, relax blood vessels, reduce the deposition of fat in blood vessels, and are very beneficial to the health of cardi…
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The common side effect of the COVID-19 vaccine, iiQ8, World Health Organization WHO

Kuwait City, 17th June 2021: The common side effect of the COVID-19 vaccine, iiQ8, World Health Organization WHO. World Health Organization announced the common side effect of the COVID-19 vaccine are: Tiredness and headache Fever Chills Pain or swelling at the injection site In most cases, these are relatively mild and last a short time. iiQ8 News The common side effect of the COVID-19 vaccine, iiQ8, World Health Organization WHO Big Best Discounts Lulu Hypermarket, iiQ8, Lulu promotions Offers Weekly Grand Hyper Kuwait Offers Deals, iiQ8, Weekly promotions 16th June 2021, Kuwait today Corona Update, iiQ8, COVID-19 Get FREE HOME DELIVERY on your orders from Grand Online, iiQ8 15th June 2021, Kuwait today Corona Update, iiQ8, COVID-19 Delta variant contracted in Kuwait, iiQ8, Indian Strain in Q8 21-day hotel quarantine for…
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People say that vaccines are linked to long-term health problems ?

People say that vaccines are linked to long-term health problems such as multiple sclerosis, diabetes, and autism. Is that true? All vaccines have possible side effects. Most, however, are mild and temporary. Adverse effects from vaccines are monitored thoroughly via multiple reporting systems, and there is no evidence from these systems to support these claims.   The vaccine information sheet for my child’s recent vaccination listed lots of potential side effects. Why is vaccination recommended if it can cause all of these side effects? Every vaccine has potential side effects. Typically they are very mild: soreness at the injection site (for a vaccine delivered via a shot), headaches, and low-grade fevers are examples of common vaccine side effects. Serious side effects are possible, however, including severe allergic reactions. However, the occurrence of these side effects is extremely rare. (Your doctor can explain the risks for individual vaccines in detai…
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Do vaccines cause autism?

Why is allergy to eggs a contraindication to getting some vaccines? Some vaccines, including the majority of vaccines against influenza, are cultured in chicken eggs. During the process of creating the vaccine, the majority of the egg protein is removed, but there is some concern that these vaccines might generate an allergic reaction in individuals with an egg allergy. A recent report found that the majority of children with egg allergies who were given a flu shot had no adverse reactions; about 5% of children in the studied group developed relatively minor reactions such as hives, the majority of which resolved without treatment.[2] Additional research is underway to study this issue further. In most cases, only people with a severe (life-threatening) allergy to eggs are recommended against receiving egg-based vaccines. Your doctor can provide specific information.   Do vaccines cause autism? No. Vaccines do not cause autism. This possibility was public…
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Do we do enough safety testing with vaccines?

Do we do enough safety testing with vaccines? Vaccines are tested repeatedly before being approved, and continue to be monitored for adverse reactions after their release. See our article on vaccine testing and safety for more information and details about this topic.   Do vaccines have aborted fetal tissue? No. The rubella vaccine virus that is included in the MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) shot is cultured using human cell lines. The vaccine material is carefully separated from the cells in which is was grown before being used. Some of these cell lines were generated from fetal tissue that was obtained in the 1960s from legal abortions. No new fetal tissue is required to generate rubella vaccine. What is herd immunity? Is it real? Does it work? How do vaccines work? Do they work against viruses and bacteria? COVID Action by Sadhguru | Empower yourself in this challenge time, iiQ8 Sadhguru Voice about COVID-19 & Vaccine, ii…
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Isn’t it true that better hygiene and nutrition were responsible for decreases in deaths and disease rates, rather than vaccines?

Isn’t it true that better hygiene and nutrition were responsible for decreases in deaths and disease rates, rather than vaccines? Improved hygiene and nutrition, among other factors, can certainly lower the incidence of some diseases. Data documenting the number of cases of a disease before and after the introduction of a vaccine, however, demonstrate that vaccines are overwhelmingly responsible for the largest drops in disease rates. Measles cases, for example, numbered anywhere from 300,000 to 800,000 a year in the United States between 1950 and 1963, when a newly licensed measles vaccine went into widespread use. By 1965, U.S. measles cases were beginning a dramatic drop. In 1968 about 22,000 cases were reported (a drop of 97.25% from the height of 800,000 cases in just three years); by 1998, the number of cases averaged about 100 per year or less. A similar post-vaccination drop occurred with most diseases for which vaccines are available. Perhaps the best evidence th…
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Why can’t we eradicate other diseases, as we did with smallpox?

Why can’t we eradicate other diseases, as we did with smallpox? In theory, nearly any infectious disease for which an effective vaccine exists should be eradicable. With sufficient vaccination levels and coordination between public health organizations, a disease can be prevented from gaining a foothold anywhere; eventually, without anyone to infect, it must die off. (A notable exception is tetanus, which is infectious but not contagious: it’s caused by a bacterium commonly found in animal feces, among other places. Thus, tetanus could not be eradicated without completely removing the Clostridium tetani bacterium from the planet.) Smallpox is unusual, however, in the set of characteristics that made it susceptible to eradication. Unlike many other infectious diseases, smallpox has no animal reservoir. That is, it can’t “hide” in an animal population and re-emerge to infect humans, while some diseases can do just that (yellow fever, for example, can infect some primates; i…
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Is the Polio vaccine linked to HIV?

Is the Polio vaccine linked to HIV? In the 1990s, certain critics began to blame the testing of a live, weakened polio vaccine in Africa in the 1950s for the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Those behind the accusation argued that chimpanzee cells were used to create the vaccine, and that those cells had been contaminated with a virus that sometimes affects chimps: simian immunodeficiency virus, or SIV. When the vaccine was given to children in Africa, they argued, SIV mutated to become human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, which causes AIDS. The accusations, however, were demonstrably false for a variety of reasons. Most notably, the weakened polio vaccine was not made with chimpanzee cells, but with monkey cells. The vaccine was later tested using a technique that can detect viral DNA (the PCR technique, or polymerase chain reaction); it did not contain SIV or HIV. Researchers at the University of Birmingham in Alabama demonstrated in 2006 that w…
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Is the Polio vaccine linked with Cancer?

Is the Polio vaccine linked with Cancer? The polio vaccines developed by Jonas Salk and Albert Sabin in the mid-20th century were made with monkey cells. Years later, microbiologist Maurice Hilleman found a monkey virus in both vaccines—the 40th monkey virus to be discovered, which he called Simian Virus 40 (SV40). (Salk’s killed vaccine, which had been treated with formaldehyde, had very small amounts of the virus; Sabin’s live vaccine was heavily contaminated.) Worried about the potential effects the virus could have on humans, Hilleman injected it into hamsters, finding that nearly all of them developed massive cancerous tumors. But the initial panic this caused gave way in the face of future studies. First, hamsters that ingested SV40 instead of being injected with it didn’t get cancer. Sabin’s live vaccine (which contained more SV40 than Salk’s) was given orally. Additional studies showed that children who were given Sabin’s vaccine did not develop antibodies to SV40…
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Why are there so many vaccines?

Why are there so many vaccines? Currently, the U.S. childhood vaccination schedule for children between birth and six years of age recommends immunizations for 14 different diseases. Some parents worry that this number seems high, particularly since some of the diseases being vaccinated against are now extremely rare in the United States. Each disease for which vaccinations are recommended, however, can causes serious illness or death in unvaccinated populations, and might quickly begin to appear again if vaccination rates dropped. The United States has seen mumps outbreaks in recent years since vaccination rates have dropped, with severe complications and hospitalizations required for some patients. And before the introduction of the Hib (Haemophilus Influenzae Type b) vaccine, Hib meningitis affected more than 12,000 American children annually, killing 600 and leaving many others with seizures, deafness, and developmental disabilities. After introduction of the vaccine,…
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Is natural immunity better than vaccine-acquired immunity?

Is natural immunity better than vaccine-acquired immunity? In some cases, natural immunity is longer-lasting than the immunity gained from vaccination. The risks of natural infection, however, outweigh the risks of immunization for every recommended vaccine. For example, wild measles infection causes encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) for one in 1,000 infected individuals. Overall, measles infection kills two of every 1,000 infected individuals. In contrast, the combination MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine results in a severe allergic reaction only once in every million vaccinated individuals, while preventing measles infection. The benefits of vaccine-acquired immunity extraordinarily outweigh the serious risks of natural infection. (For more on this topic, see our Understanding Risks activity.) Additionally, the Hib (Haemophilus influenzae type b) and tetanus vaccines actually provide more effective immunity than natural infection.   COVID A…
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Why do some vaccines require boosters?

Why do some vaccines require boosters? It’s not completely understood why the length of acquired immunity varies with different vaccines. Some offer lifelong immunity with only one dose, while others require boosters in order to maintain immunity. Recent research has suggested that the persistence of immunity against a particular disease may depend on the speed with which that disease typically progresses through the body. If a disease progresses very rapidly, the immune system’s memory response (that is, the “watchdog antibodies” generated after a previous infection or vaccination) may not be able to respond quickly enough to prevent infection—unless they’ve been “reminded” about the disease fairly recently and are already watching for it. Boosters serve as a “reminder” to your immune system. Research is continuing on the persistence of immunity generated by vaccines.   COVID Action by Sadhguru | Empower yourself in this challenge time, iiQ8 Sadhgur…
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Why do we vaccinate against a mild disease like chickenpox?

My child was invited to a chickenpox party. Would it be better for my child to get the chickenpox this way? Why do we vaccinate against a mild disease like chickenpox? The idea of “pox parties” is generally tied to the perception of chickenpox as a harmless illness. Before the varicella vaccine became available, however, chickenpox infections required 10,000 hospitalizations and caused more than 100 deaths each year in the United States. Exposing a child to wild chickenpox puts him at risk for a severe case of the disease. Even uncomplicated cases of chickenpox cause children to miss a week or more of school, with a caregiver missing work to care for the sick child.[1] Natural infection also means a risk of infecting others: while successful vaccination protects a child against chickenpox without this risk, children who are infected with chickenpox naturally are contagious. They can spread the disease to other people—not just other children, but also adults, who have a hi…
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why do some vaccines have live pathogens but others have killed pathogens?

Can you get a disease from the vaccine that’s supposed to prevent it? And why do some vaccines have live pathogens but others have killed pathogens? Vaccines that are made with killed versions of pathogens—or with only a part of the pathogen—are not able to cause illness. When a person receives these vaccines, it is impossible for him or her to become ill with the disease. Live, attenuated (or weakened) vaccines are theoretically capable of causing illness: because they can still replicate (though not well), mutation is possible, which can result in a virulent form of the pathogen. However, they are designed with this in mind, and attenuated to minimize this possibility. Reversion to virulent form is a problem with some forms of the oral polio vaccine (OPV), which is why only the inactivated form (IPV) is now used in the United States. It is important to note that attenuated vaccines can cause serious problems for individuals with weakened immune systems, such as cance…
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Can babies’ immune systems handle so many vaccines?

Can babies’ immune systems handle so many vaccines? Yes. Studies demonstrate that infants’ immune systems can handle receiving many vaccines at once—more than the number currently recommended. The immunization schedule is based on infants’ ability to generate immune responses, as well as when they are at risk of certain illnesses. For example, the immunity passed from mother to child at birth is only temporary, and typically does not include immunity against polio, hepatitis B, Haemophilus influenzae type b, and other diseases that can be prevented by vaccination. What is herd immunity? Is it real? Does it work? COVID Action by Sadhguru | Empower yourself in this challenge time, iiQ8 Sadhguru Voice about COVID-19 & Vaccine, iiQ8 Eat Less & Walk with Bare Foot , iiQ8, Health & Yoga, Sadhguru Voice Shaving Head Vs Raise Your Energies, iiQ8, Sadhguru Voice, Wisdom Heated Debate Sadhguru – Manju Warrier – Shashi Kumar, iiQ8
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Why is there a new flu vaccine every year?

Why is there a new flu vaccine every year? Unlike most vaccines, which contain the most common strains of a given pathogen (if more than one exists) and are rarely changed, the seasonal flu vaccine changes frequently, though one or more of the flu strains in the vaccine may be retained from one year to the next. This is because the strains of influenza viruses that circulate are constantly changing. Each year, researchers choose viruses for the vaccine based on which ones are likely to be circulating over the course of the coming flu season, thus providing protection against the most prevalent strains. So when you get a seasonal flu vaccine, you’re usually not getting another “dose” of the same flu vaccine you were given before. Instead, you’re usually getting protection against a whole new batch of flu viruses.
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What is herd immunity? Is it real? Does it work?

What is herd immunity? Is it real? Does it work? Herd immunity, also known as community immunity, refers to the protection offered to everyone in a community by high vaccination rates. With enough people immunized against a given disease, it’s difficult for the disease to gain a foothold in the community. This offers some protection to those who are unable to receive vaccinations—including newborns and individuals with chronic illnesses—by reducing the likelihood of an outbreak that could expose them to the disease.
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Why aren’t all vaccines 100% effective?

Why aren’t all vaccines 100% effective? Vaccines are designed to generate an immune response that will protect the vaccinated individual during future exposures to the disease. Individual immune systems, however, are different enough that in some cases, a person’s immune system will not generate an adequate response. As a result, he or she will not be effectively protected after immunization. That said, the effectiveness of most vaccines is high. After receiving the second dose of the MMR vaccine (measles, mumps and rubella) or the standalone measles vaccine, 99.7% of vaccinated individuals are immune to measles. The inactivated polio vaccine offers 99% effectiveness after three doses. The varicella (chickenpox) vaccine is between 85% and 90% effective in preventing all varicella infections, but 100% effective in preventing moderate and severe chicken pox. How do vaccines work? Do they work against viruses and bacteria? Shaving Head Vs Raise Your Energies, i…
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How do vaccines work? Do they work against viruses and bacteria?

How do vaccines work? Do they work against viruses and bacteria? Vaccines work to prime your immune system against future “attacks” by a particular disease. There are vaccines against both viral and bacterial pathogens, or disease-causing agents. When a pathogen enters your body, your immune system generates antibodies to try to fight it off. Depending on the strength of your immune response and how effectively the antibodies fight off the pathogen, you may or may not get sick. If you do fall ill, however, some of the antibodies that are created will remain in your body playing watchdog after you’re no longer sick. If you’re exposed to the same pathogen in the future, the antibodies will ”recognize” it and fight it off. Vaccines work because of this function of the immune system. They’re made from a killed, weakened, or partial version of a pathogen. When you get a vaccine, whatever version of the pathogen it contains isn’t strong or plentiful enough to make you sic…
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COVID Action by Sadhguru | Empower yourself in this challenge time, iiQ8

Empower Yourself in Challenging Times Isha COVID Action - India Sadhguru will address the COVID surge in India, and what we can do to protect ourselves and support each other. Watch Sadhguru Live on 29 April, 6:30 PM IST #Sadhguru​​ Yogi, mystic and visionary, Sadhguru is a spiritual master with a difference. An arresting blend of profundity and pragmatism, his life and work serves as a reminder that yoga is a contemporary science, vitally relevant to our times. #SadhguruVoice​ #Sadhguru​​ Isha Covid Action. Join Sadhguru Live on 29th April 6:30 PM IST

COVID Action by Sadhguru, Empower yourself in this challenge time, iiQ8 Sadhguru Voice about COVID-19 & Vaccine, iiQ8 Eat Less & Walk with Bare Foot , iiQ8, Health & Yoga, Sadhguru Voice Shaving Head Vs Raise Your Energies, iiQ8, Sadhguru Voice, Wisdom Heated Debate Sadhguru – Manju Warrier – Shashi Kumar, iiQ8 5 Simple Way…
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